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Ten Examples of the Impact of Visual Asset Management

The Impact of Visual Asset Management

Organizations of every size and every industry are facing a huge challenge. In the age of communicating visually, only a fraction of organizations have a system to help them manage their visual assets, according to a study by the CMO Council and Libris by PhotoShelter. The findings revealed that while senior marketers are committed to producing massive amounts of visual content, managing that content effectively is not a priority.

This dissonance presents a major problem for organizations. Teams that aren’t preparing for what our CEO Andrew Fingerman calls the ‘visual content apocalypse’ run the risk of duplicating costs, lost assets, copyright infringement and widespread frustration.

If dodging these pitfalls isn’t enough to convince your team to invest in digital asset management, organizations that use visual asset management see huge returns.

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The study shows that teams using visual asset management benefited from easy access to a library of brand visuals. They saw streamlined creative processes and an improved, more unified brand experience for customers.

These ten case studies highlight the benefits of visual asset management for brand communications, from fast public relations, to efficient workflow, to historical preservation.

A Unified Brand Experience

Half of senior marketers using visual asset management to power their communications say the greatest impact to their business has been how the system ‘aligned teams around common brand visuals and assets to create a unified experience.’ In this visual age, your organization’s photos and videos define your reputation with customers. An organized photo and video library helps teams collaborate and enables brands to present consistent messaging across platforms. These case studies show how visual asset management can help you build your brand.

Visit Greenland: Improved Branding

Visit Greenland provides free, high quality photos to partners (like tour operators in Greenland and abroad) to ensure a fresh, diverse representation of the country abroad. But when the organization used a combination of Flickr and Dropbox to share photos, partners found the system too tedious to use. The team decided to move over to a cloud-based digital asset management system where they could store all of their high resolution photos in an easily-searchable archive.

The Outcome: Streamlined Workflow and Controlled Messaging. Since moving to Libris, Visit Greenland has seen an uptick in stakeholder adoption of the new system. Now, partners are accessing the photos and sharing them, fueling a better representation of Greenland around the world.

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Global Heritage Fund: Website Overhaul
Photo by Plinio Barraza, courtesy of the Global Heritage Fund.

Case Study: How the Global Heritage Fund Refreshed its Website with a Photo-First Strategy. Photo by Plinio Barraza, courtesy of the Global Heritage Fund.

The nonprofit Global Heritage Fund relies on donations to restore heritage sites around the world, but they were working with a website that was filled with text and difficult to navigate. It failed to show donors their real impact. So the team overhauled the website to put images in the spotlight using their image library on Libris.

The Outcome: Centralization and Engagement. The Global Heritage Fund’s website visitation has increased two-fold from about 4-5,000 visits per month to 8-10,000. By using a visual communications strategy, the nonprofit has engaged new visitors and shown donors their impact.

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LEGOLAND Florida: Lightning Fast Public Relations

When LEGOLAND Florida held a Grand Opening for its new hotel, three photographers worked together to capture the ten minute event. As soon as it was over, they uploaded all their photos into a Libris gallery. The lead photographer and collection manager, Chip Litherland, narrowed it down to a group of 80 selects, which he shared with LEGOLAND’s public relations team. The PR team chose 10 photos to share with the press, and sent out a download link within minutes.

The Outcome: Speed and Controlled Messaging. LEGOLAND managed to beat the news outlets who covered the event, and had the advantage of controlling their own message.

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PhotoShelter: Efficient Review and Delivery

When the team here at PhotoShelter produced our own video ad for social media in-house, we shared the first version with the review team on Libris. Then, when we had an approved final version, we granted high resolution download access to the person who needed to publish the ad.

The Outcome: Collaboration and Efficiency. Visual asset management allowed fast and easy review and file delivery for our team, which isn’t always easy when you’re working with large, high resolution video files.

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A Centralized Repository

Half of senior marketers say the greatest business impact of visual asset management has been how the system ‘streamlined creative processes as all teams work from a centralized repository of images and assets.’ A cloud-based digital asset management system gives teams access to an organization’s visual assets anytime, anywhere. A centralized system helps teams take advantage of an organization’s visual assets, whether they need to access them now or 10 years from now. These case studies demonstrate how a centralized repository can revolutionize your organization’s creative processes.

Adventure Travel Trade Association: Post-Event Engagement

The Adventure Travel Trade Association (ATTA) hosts an annual Summit that brings together adventure tourism professionals from around the globe. The photographers who captured the event uploaded all their photos to a Libris collection, and the ATTA team sent out the link to the 700 delegates who participated in the Summit.

The Outcome: Distribution and Engagement. The collection quickly had more than 12,000 views as delegates found the photos and shared them with their friends. By sharing photos of the Summit with everyone who participated, ATTA engaged their audience and encouraged them to share the message with their networks.

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Chick-Fil-A: Breaking Down Silos

When the first Chick-Fil-A location opened in New York City, everyone wanted to see the photos. Photographer and visual asset manager Stanley Leary uploaded the photos to Libris to make the photos available to Chick-Fil-A’s 2,000 franchises (which have 70,000 team members).

The Outcome: Centralization and Distribution. By using visual asset management to share images internally, Chick-Fil-A was able to break down the silos often found in large organizations.

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University of Tennessee: Generating Revenue

Tennessee Volunteers fans love the university’s Twitter account, @vol_photos, but they wanted more. They wanted to buy the photos and frame them for their fan caves. Enter, the Vol Photo Store, built on an NCAA compliant sales system with Libris.

The Outcome: Organization, Compliance and Revenue. Now, fans can buy their favorite game photos and special edition prints. Meanwhile, the university is generating revenue and offsetting the cost of visual asset management.

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Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves: Repurposing Content
Case Study: Shell and Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves Team Up to Fuel Visual Storytelling. Photo by Romana Manpreet, courtesy of Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves.

Case Study: Shell and Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves Team Up to Fuel Visual Storytelling. Photo by Romana Manpreet, courtesy of Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves.

When the nonprofit Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves had the chance to produce television PSAs in partnership with Shell, they used their archive to pull video footage that demonstrated their impact. It was shot for another project years earlier, but worked perfectly for the Shell spots.

The Outcome: Searchability and Engagement. By taking advantage of archive footage, the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves created powerful new content with a formidable partner.

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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Using a Rich Archive to Engage Fans
Case Study: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Digs into its Photo Archive. Photo courtesy of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Case Study: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Digs into its Photo Archive. Photo courtesy of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette has been covering Pittsburgh news since 1786. The news team regularly takes advantage of its rich photo archive for a feature called ‘The Digs.’ And when a popular Steelers player retired, they used their Libris library to quickly pull together a slideshow of highlights from his career to share in news stories and on social media.

The Outcome: Centralization, Easy Access and Engagement. By storing their historical imagery on a cloud-based platform, the Post-Gazette team can pull photos that provide valuable context quickly and easily.

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Catholic University: Preserving a Historic Moment
Case Study: A Different Perspective on Pope Francis’ Visit to Catholic University. Photo by Justin Walker, courtesy of Catholic University.

Case Study: A Different Perspective on Pope Francis’ Visit to Catholic University. Photo by Justin Walker, courtesy of Catholic University.

25,000 people flocked to Catholic University when Pope Francis came to visit, all armed with a cell phone camera. But the university’s communications team wanted to capture a different perspective. Four photographers captured the day from every angle with a uniquely Catholic U perspective. Afterward, they uploaded all of their photos to Libris to share with anyone in the university community.

The Outcome: Archiving and Engagement. In the long term, all of the images from this historic day will be easily accessible by Catholic U staff members, students, alumni and community members. They will be preserved for the next time a Pope comes to visit, and as photographer Ed Pfueller said, they will be used for the next 100 years.

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